accidentally on purpose

Bullseye Buzz: The #SorryNotSorry Social Media Playbook

Posted by & filed under Digital Marketing News Roundup, mobile advertising, Social Media, Social Media Marketing, Twitter.

By Mark Eting

Bullseye Strategy Special Correspondent

If you’ve ever managed a brand’s social media account and noticed how a humorous-to-the-outsider mistake corresponded with a big leap in engagements, we’ve got a barstool reserved for you. Being the laughing stock of the Internet is not the kind of engagement rate spike most marketers covet…most of them, that is. Some of them, however, are embracing mistakes…on purpose. Welcome to the new era of #SorryNotSorry social media. In other digital marketing developments this week, a boom in highway exit ramp burger sales has both McDonald’s and traffic app Waze saying, “I’m lovin’ it.” And we’re intrigued by YouTube’s test of putting warning notes on videos that might be #FakeNews.

digital marketing news

Everyone Get Your Tickets for the #AmazonShitCarShow

Oops, they meant the #AmazonsHitCarShow. Or did they? Twitter conversations about the third season of Amazon Prime’s Grand Tour weren’t as much about cars but about the choice of hashtag, which the ZNet called excellent marketing.  Marketing Tech News explored this faux-faux pas and other “accidentally on purpose” social media plays. If this is indeed a new trend, pass the popcorn.

amazons hit car show

Waze To Sell Rib Sandwiches, McDonald’s!

McDonald’s has discovered that billboard advertising and mobile ads go together like a burger and fries…or make that a McRib and fries, in this case. The world’s largest spender on OOH advertising matched the creative on 300 billboards in Southern California with geofenced ads served up on the app Waze when drivers were at a full stop located near a McDonald’s. Waze app navigation successfully guided 8.4k app users to their nearest golden arches, according to Mobile Marketer.

McDonalds Waze OOH

Youtube Tests Out #FakeNews Pop-Up

In an effort to sift out misinformation, YouTube is testing out a pop-up that will warn viewers that the content they’re viewing isn’t necessarily accurate. This isn’t the first time a social media platform has flagged content that had some truth…challenges. Facebook offered similar technology with a Snopes partnership in 2017, but implementation ended up causing more controversies than anticipated and the partnership with Snopes was discontinued.

fact check from YouTube

“Mark Eting” is the pen name of the Bullseye Strategy team. Check back with us next week for more news on what’s buzzing in the digital marketing industry.